Not If I See You First

Not If I See You First

Not If I See You First
Eric Lindstrom

HarperCollins

ISBN 9780008146313

The sensational debut YA of 2016 that everyone will be talking about. Parker Grant doesn't need perfect vision to see right through you. That's why she created the Rules: Don't treat her any differently just because she's blind, and never take advantage. There will be no second chances. When Scott Kilpatrick, the boy who broke her heart, suddenly reappears at school, Parker knows there's only one way to react - shun him so hard it hurts. She has enough to deal with already, like trying out for the track team, handing out tough-love advice to her painfully naive classmates, and giving herself gold stars for every day she hasn't cried since her dad's death. But avoiding her past quickly proves impossible, and the more Parker learns about what really happened - both with Scott, and her dad - the more she starts to question if things are always as they seem. Exhilarating and real, `Not if I See You First' will change the way you see things forever.

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Reviews

Not If I See You First3/5

Not If I See You First

Eric Lindstrom

Review

Parker Grant is blind, and coping with the recent death of her father. She is also a talented runner, and a pretty acerbic character, not tolerating any nonsense from those around her. Her Rules go from 1-11 plus infinity, and set out very clearly how the people in her life should treat her as a blind person. The character of 16 year old Parker is what made the book work for me, she is not immediately likeable, but we get right inside her, and see the vulnerability she will not admit, as well as the fierce independence. The first person present tense narrative adds to this. The practicalities of coping in life without sight seem to be well researched, and are there without being laboured. The book is particularly good on female friendships, with Sarah, the one constant friend, as well as others who have drifted away from Parker, as well as Molly, the pupil selected to support her at school, who quickly becomes a new friend. They are fiercely supportive when needed, and they come to realise how important this solidarity is to each other. I was less sure about the romantic element, with Parker getting a new boyfriend, Jason, but obviously really hankering after Scott, the boy who she believes betrayed her when she was 13. This will appeal to some readers, but at times I felt it became a bit repetitive. One element that worked well was the descriptions of running. Parker runs on her own each morning, quite a challenge for a blind girl, and this gives her a feeling of freedom and release. She eventually joins the running team at school, to run with a sighted partner, but her recklessness comes to the fore when she runs on the track with only her friend guiding her by mobile phone instructions. Her feelings of freedom and exhilaration are well portrayed. A YA friendship and romance novel, with a feisty female lead, and something to say about bereavement and disability. 416 pages / Ages 12+ / Reviewed by Carol Williams, school librarian.

Reviewed by: Carol Williams