We See Everything

We See Everything

We See Everything
William Sutcliffe

Bloomsbury Childrens Books

ISBN 9781408890196

NOMINATED FOR THE CILIP CARNEGIE MEDAL 2019 SHORTLISTED FOR THE RED TENTACLE AT THE KITSCHIES 2017 A gripping and powerfully relevant thriller set in a reimagined London where drone surveillance is the norm. We See Everything, from internationally bestselling author William Sutcliffe, simmers with tension and emotion. Lex lives on The Strip - the overcrowded, closed-off, bombed-out shell of London. He's used to the watchful enemy drones that buzz in the air above him. Alan's talent as a gamer has landed him the job of his dreams. At a military base in a secret location, he is about to start work as a drone pilot. These two young men will never meet, but their lives are destined to collide. Because Alan has just been assigned a high-profile target. Alan knows him only as #K622. But Lex calls him Dad.

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Reviews

We See Everything4/5

We See Everything

William Sutcliffe

Review

William Sutcliffe's new novel is a compelling and disturbing tale set in a stark, futuristic London. Lex lives on The London Strip, a battle-scarred area of land that is home to those left after a series of bombardments. Living in constant fear of a new attack, life is grim and unrelenting. As part of the resistance group, The Corps, Lex and his family enjoy a degree of protection on The Strip but the constant surveillance of drones means that they are never safe from the sinister reach of the military.

Former gamer and now drone pilot, Alan has been assigned Lex's father as a target. Drilled in military procedure, Alan leads a lonely life away from the safety and structure of the base. Watching Lex and his family every day, Alan begins to feel an unlikely bond with his quarry and starts to question the unstoppable and deadly collision of their worlds.

We See Everything is a terrifying, fast-paced and moving account of a world that feels not-too-distant from our own. Whilst touching on political themes and the inhumanity of war, it focuses on Lex and his relationship with his family and girlfriend, Zoe. My only complaint is the lack of a background story, I would love to know why London has been reduced to this state. There are some clues to the timeline but I think the context is (maybe deliberately) is a little hazy. However, it's a brilliantly-written and important read for the 12 plus age group and is the sort of book that can easily be devoured in one sitting.

Pages 257 / Ages 12+ / Reviewed by Clare Wilkins, school librarian.

Reviewed by: Clare Wilkins