NEWS INDEPTH

Supporting Reading for Pleasure

ReadingZone has worked with a number of professionals to develop key steps that can help your school develop a reading for pleasure strategy. These steps also provide the kind of evidence of reading for pleasure that Ofsted will be looking for.

You can download the following ideas via the PDF, below.

Key to encouraging children to read is supporting teachers in developing as readers. Teachers are often the best-placed person in a child's environment to suggest books that children might enjoy reading.

Other suggestions range from developing class libraries, joining a school library service, growing the range of materials available to pupils and visits to the local library.

The ideas are listed in the PDF that you can download, or read below.


SUPPORTING READING FOR PLEASURE


READ YOURSELF

UKLA research into Teachers as Readers demonstrated that unless teachers are readers and know contemporary authors and books, they are unable to introduce their pupils to a broad range of literature.

Ofsted is also looking for evidence that teachers know about contemporary writers and poets.


MAKE THE BEST BOOKS AVAILABLE TO PUPILS

Find out about the best authors and who your pupils' favourites are and ensure those books are available in your school.


KEEP UP TO DATE WITH WHAT IS BEING PUBLISHED

There are about 10,000 new titles published each month but there are ways to find out about the best of them, for example by visiting your local bookshop, or signing up to ReadingZone's enewsletters here:
http://www.readingzone.com/index.php?zone=sz&page=newsletter


LOBBY FOR A SCHOOL LIBRARY

Many schools do not have a school library, yet a library, and trained librarians, should be the hub of a school's learning activity, and you will value the professional support that librarians offer.

School libraries are a life-line to books for children – especially those who don’t have books at home.


SUBSCRIBE TO A SCHOOL LIBRARY SERVICE

A School Library Service is a regional service that specialises in supplying books to schools, updating school libraries, keeping you informed about new books etc.


BUILD YOUR OWN CLASS LIBRARY

Especially if there is no school library, a class library will give children access to books they need to develop a passion for reading.

Ensure there is space to relax and read, areas for displays and reviews, and new books regularly displayed.

Make boys as well as girls library monitors and encourage them to help choose new books for the library.


DEVELOP THE RANGE OF MATERIALS AVAILABLE TO CHILDREN

Non-fiction books, graphic novels, comics and newspapers all have a place in every well-stocked library.


INCLUDE READING FOR PLEASURE IN YOUR TIMETABLE

Some schools put aside half an hour every day for the whole school to stop and read.


INSIST ON READ-ALOUD SESSIONS

Every day! Share whole books with your class – here are some ideas to begin with:
http://www.readingzone.com/index.php?zone=sz&page=book_lists


READ ACROSS THE CURRICULUM

Reading is not just for English lessons and Ofsted wants to see evidence of reading across all subjects –History, Geography, Science etc.

Again, here are some ideas to start with:
http://www.readingzone.com/index.php?zone=sz&page=book_lists


SET UP BOOK CLUBS

You can create book clubs for enthusiastic as well as reluctant readers. Either target particular children or open it up to everyone.

Encourage children to recommend books to each other, bring in book selections they can take home to read, and don't forget the nibbles - juice and biscuits - for each event.


ENCOURAGE CHILDREN TO JOIN THEIR PUBLIC LIBRARY

Better still, take them to the library! Encourage children to read outside of school and to get specialist recommendations.

Some children don't realise that libraries also provide internet access and space to do homework etc – or that they are free!


PROMOTE THE SUMMER READING CHALLENGE

Most libraries will run a Summer Reading Challenge, challenging children to read six books during the summer holidays.

This helps keep their reading levels up during the summer break, and you can celebrate the achievement by presenting their certificates in assembly in the Autumn.


VISIT YOUR LOCAL BOOKSHOP

Bookshops often run events with authors and can help children with recommendations etc, so pay them a visit with your class.

Often children (and parents) can feel too intimidated to enter bookshops without an introduction.


GET FAMILIES ON BOARD

Many parents see it as the school's job to teach their children to read and underestimate the importance of reading at home, library and bookshop visits etc.


DEVELOP BOOK-BASED PROJECTS

Involve them in creating author displays, creating video book trailers, making plays out of stories etc.

ReadingZone'S Create a Picture Book competition launches every January – children can work together and as picture books don’t need a lot of words, it's a great project for less confident writers.


USE ASSEMBLIES

To talk about new books / tell stories / act out stories


INVITE AUTHORS AND ILLUSTRATORS TO VISIT

– one of the best ways to inspire readers!

Find out about authors you can invite and how to set up your own author events here:

http://www.readingzone.com/index.php?zone=sz&page=authorvisits


PUT READING FOR PLEASURE AT THE HEART OF YOUR SCHOOL'S IMPROVEMENT STRATEGY

Persuade the head!

"Finding ways to engage pupils in reading may be one of the most effective ways to leverage social change"
(Reading for Change, Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development, 2002)

"As students become engaged readers, they provide themselves with self-generated learning opportunities that are equivalent to several years of education."
(Guthrie J.T. and Wigfield A., Engagement and Motivation in Reading, 2000)

17/05/2012
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